Bangkok Time
 

ABOUT

  My website    
  My recent books: Memory Manifesto
  International Crime Writers Blog
  Email me
 

Subscribe to this blog

 

 

 

 

Memory Manifesto

Memory Manifesto

eBook: Kindle - Kobo - Smashwords

---------------------------------------

Jumpers

Jumpers

eBook: Kindle - Kobo - Smashwords

---------------------------------------

The Age of Dis-Consent

The Age of Dis-Consent

eBook: Kindle - Kobo - Smashwords

 

 

LATEST BLOG POSTS

 

 
 

LATEST COMMENTS

 
 
  ARCHIVES
  May 2017
  March 2017
  January 2017
  December 2016
  November 2016
  October 2016
  September 2016
  August 2016
 

More>>

   
  Search in this blog
 


 

 

By Christopher Hitchens

For a large part of humanity mankind’s faith has been shaped by religious text that emerged from tribal desert dwellers who lived around 2,000 years ago. The poison of which Hitchens writes is an old and potent brew. It makes us stupid to the reality of the world and has killed many of us as well. The religious view of the origins of the universe or the nature of man was and remains much closer to the thought processes of Cro-Magon than modern, secular people. Their strange dietary taboos, hamlet raids, child abuse, racial hatreds was only exceeded by their ignorance and untiring commitment to blood sacrifice and violence. But they were clever enough to commit their ugly crimes under the authority of a superior being who they claimed spoke directly to them. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/29/2007 11:46:15 PM 

 

A recent essay has suggested that novelists have lost their way by moving away from the comedy aspect of life and plunging instead deep into tragedy. Julian Gough in his essay on Divine Comedy has argued: “Yet western culture since the middle ages has overvalued the tragic and undervalued the comic. We think of tragedy as major, and comedy as minor. Brilliant comedies never win the best film Oscar. The Booker prize leans toward the tragic.”

What caught my attention was his spot on description of what happens when a novel is done right: ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/21/2007 10:03:11 PM 

 

Keeping a pulse on political, economic and social developments in Thailand is never an easy task even if you live in Thailand. A certain skill is needed to read between the lines of not only what is said but what has not been said. I have another purpose. Often I will come across an article about a place or person that sends me out the door to investigate for possible material to be used in a novel. Many of my novels also have a political angle and it is good to have a wide source of opinion and information about the fault lines that characters seek to avoid. Often news from the political world reads like noir fiction and that makes it all the more compelling to form part of a crime novel.

The leading English language newspapers are: ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/21/2007 1:03:42 AM 

 

Who The Hell Are We Fighting? The Story of Sam Adams and the Vietnam Intelligence War, C. Michael Hiam, Hanover, NH: Steerforth Press (2006), 326 pages, biblio., index.

Who the Hell Are We Fighting?
is a biography about Sam Adams, an intelligence operative who fought to convince his superiors at the early stages of the Vietnam war that the number of Viet Cong were two to three times greater than the politically inspired MACV figures. Sam’s story illustrates how domestic American politics and the narrow vision of generals and politicians became the driving force. Their determination was enough to dismiss contrary evidence based on Sam Adams’ in depth knowledge about culture, history and nationalistic feelings in Vietnam. Denial of the truth, as we have seen in Iraq, is guaranteed to produce a disaster. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/18/2007 1:12:29 AM 

 

Perfect Hostage: A Life of Aung San Sui Kyi, by Justin Wintle, Random House (2007) 450 pps, with photographs. Available at all bookstores in Thailand through amazon.

On Monday evening 14th May, Justin Wintle’s political biography of Aung San Sui Kyi was launched at the Foreign Correspondents Club of Thailand. The author said Aung San Sui Kyi had been influenced by her mother, by Buddhism, by the principle of non-violence, and her time working in the UN. All of these factors had shaped her worldview. A ten-minute documentary was showed. The documentary was about Aung San Sui Kyi’s brush with death in 2003 when her motorcade was attacked by a hired mob in Burma. Many people were killed in that confrontation. Though the exact figure remains a subject of controversy. There never has been a government inquiry into the clash....
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/15/2007 6:22:42 AM 

 

101 Tales of Sex, Crime, and the Bizarre from Japan’s Wild Weeklies, Tabloid Tokyo 2, (2007) pp. 286 complied by Mark Schreiber For anyone who thinks that globalization has made the world flat Mark Schreiber has a surprise for them. He has brought together a rich tapestry of strange happenings in offices, homes, trains, streets and bedrooms of modern Japan. The tales are plucked from weeklies like Sukhan Shincho, Shukan Bushun, Flash, Friday, Tsukuru and Shukan Gendai. For those who fear the erosion of the divide between the East and West, Schreiber has substantial evidence of the void between the two. The collected articles are recent (2002-2006), short and to the point. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/11/2007 6:45:54 AM 

 

Robert Roberts has sent along his review of A Haunting Smile.

“What with Thailand in the news recently for a pedophile, a military coup, a monetary misstep and having an ability to reverberate far beyond its borders one could do a lot worse than read this book for an understanding of an important country often misunderstood and maligned. Though it is a work of fiction A Haunting Smile deals with the 1991 military overthrow of democratically elected government and subsequent violent suppression of the popular broad-based response to it by the Thai people. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/9/2007 11:07:08 PM 

 

Tim Hallinan’s new book A Nail Through the Heart will be released in the United States by William Morrow (July 1, 2007). You can read a sample chapter free by going to Tim’s blog:
http://www.timothyhallinan.com/nail_chapter.html

He also has advance praise from well-known novelists, including:

“A Nail Through the Heart is a haunting novel that takes place way out on the fringe of the moral landscape. It’s fast, bold, disturbing and beautifully written. Hallinan is terrific.” --T. Jefferson Parker...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/9/2007 4:29:39 AM 

 


Every year for the past 19 years there has been a festival in North Spain to celebrate crime fiction and thrillers. Along with Henning Mankell, Donna Leon, Christopher Priest, Peter Berling, Petros Markakis and Bob Reiss, I have been invited to attend. It is also know as “Black Week” of Gijon. The ten-day festival includes, concerts, films and exhibitions as well as books. Over a million people attend the festival each year. I have been invited to talk about the Spanish edition of Zero Hour in Phnom Penh. Paidós, my Spanish publisher released Hora Cero en Phnom Penh in April....
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/8/2007 12:25:47 AM 

 

One of the challenges in writing fiction is to create good characters. It is not uncommon to meet someone and think that would be an interesting character. What makes a character standout from the crowd? (Of course there are very good novels where the character is lost in the crowd, and that is a different kind of novel.) Usually there is a personal tic or quality in a character that draws my attention.

A friend recently suggested that he may have found the ultimate character for a novel. The novel is about the man who loves cats and is trying to kick a drug habit. One day, though, he’s in the midst of withdrawal and the straw comes out of nowhere and before it knows it, the cat doesn’t stand a chance.

...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/4/2007 3:47:18 AM 

 

On Saturday 26th April I spoke before about 100 members of the Chiang Mai Expat Club. I talked about the history of how Vincent Calvino was created. This took me back to the mid-1980s when I lived in New York City and had the chance to ride with NYPD as a civilian observer. The late night shifts in Brookyln and Harlem laid the foundation for Calvino's world. Setting a private eye series in Southeast Asia with a New York lead character was another subject of conversation. I believed in 1990 when I started writing Spirit House, that the fundamental qualities of a private eye required a sharp eye for dealing with social injustice, abuse of power, corrupt politicians, and influential mafia figures. It is always the small guy without influence that is trapped in such a web and the reader turns the pages to find out how such a person fights overwhelmning odds. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/1/2007 11:05:16 PM 

 

Again the distant drums are beating a coded message: "We are interested in your books."
At least that is the way I have decoded the message. It is possible what the real message is: "We are fishing in every pond and stumbled across your tiny puddle and are having a good laugh."

An outline for a film for Waiting for the Lady is in play. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/1/2007 11:03:51 PM 

 

Slowly the basic elements are coming together for the 10th Calvino novel. The process is not unlike planet formation in the universe. There is a lot of dust to gather into a ball. The problem with creating planets is most of them are big balls of gas. The same applies to most ideas for a novel. Creating a planet or a novel that can be inhabited easily is a rare, random act. The main difference is that we would like a couple of million other planets exactly like our own. No one wants to keep reading the same novel over and over again. The reality is that none of the writing gets any easier from book to book. If anything, the process becomes more difficult. At this point, I am still working through some new ideas that will bring a new character and point of view to the 10th novel. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 5/1/2007 11:01:41 PM 

 

Sometimes I hear disgruntled writers saying publishers in American won’t publish novels set in Thailand. That is rubbish. John Burdett’s Bangkok 8 and Bangkok Tattoo were published by Random House and received a great amount of media attention.

More recently, a novel titled Fieldwork: A Novel by Mischa Berlinski has been published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. That is one of the top literary publisher in New York. Stephen King has now lent his weight by endorsing the novel. Mischa Berlinski was born in New York in 1973 and studied classics at the University of California at Berkeley and at Columbia University. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 4/10/2007 1:22:42 AM 

 

This month the Spanish Edition of Zero Hour in Phnom Penh will be released by Paidos as Hora Cero en Phnom Penh. The publisher is releasing three novels in an international fiction series which include mine and novels by Charles McCarry and Peter Temple. Paidos have a video clip on their website about the authors: http://www.paidos.com/alea.asp

In a previous post I wrote about the desirability of a writer entering the world, experiencing life in its full wonder, confusion, misery; strolling the back lanes, taking risks, exploring the over looked places and people, and observing the fine detail of what life offers. I am reading Charles McCarry's Old Boys. McCarry is ex-CIA and when it comes to describing tradecraft, the reader has the chill of discovery what happens on the ground. There is a scene with a bomb hidden in the cistern ready for the flush. The description of this scene is so convincing as to suggest it was one of those nuggets pulled out of the pocket of actual experience....
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 4/8/2007 10:29:35 PM 

 

I drop in to have a look at other author blogs from time to time. Mostly this is a huge waste of time. Here’s my take on the near hysterical rantings on many blogs. There is an obsession with marketing and promotion. Where someone ranks on Google or MySpace is not what writers should be worried about. What is getting lost in all the competition for attention is what readers want. They want someone who spends time not studying marketing techniques but a book that is a product of studying the human condition.

That means getting out among people of all kinds; and not sticking to close friends and family. Imagination must be fed by curiosity otherwise it dies. The life-blood of a good to great novel is one inspired by heartfelt experiences, ones that the author is able to articulate and weave into an overall story. The current preoccupation blogging authors have with marketing gimmicks is turning a generation of writers into junior sales reps who spend a great amount of time thinking of new ways to sell additional books. Of course an author needs to be concerned about selling enough books to keep his/her publisher wanting to publish the next one. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 4/3/2007 11:44:20 PM 

 

The terrain of Bangkok nightlife often features in my novels and those of others who set their fiction in the City of Angels. Chris Coles has taken a different route to reach the same end. I find his extraordinary art provocative, disturbing, and insightful into the human condition. If you haven’t heard of Chris Coles or his painting, check out his website: http://www.chriscolesgallery.com I don’t know anyone else who is capturing the genuine feeling of the street life, the faces of the night, and the sheer colorful madness that outsiders experience the first time they walk into Nana Plaza, Soi Cowboy or Patpong.

Below is a recent painting of Soi Cowboy.

...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 4/3/2007 12:44:50 AM 

 

In between writing novels falls a lot of rain, hail and sleet. And that is something given the temperature in Thailand rarely drops below 20C. I spent time with the crew of Do You Believe in Love, a documentary about – you guessed it – love, interviewing an expat couple (French) about the meaning of love in 2007. Tomorrow is another interview with a German woman who had been married to a Thai. I will be finding out what goes on when love comes to an end in Thailand.

Also I put the wraps on a draft of a non-fiction project. The first draft is done. I use the term “done” with extreme caution has a first draft is hardly a finished book. It is the start along the path of a finished books. The path includes three more drafts (and numerous mini-drafts within each major rewrite. Then come outside reader comments and copyeditors and proof readers. It is a miracle at a book is ever produced. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 3/26/2007 4:01:59 AM 

 

Congrats to Stephen Leather whose novel Cold Kill has made the shortlist for this year’s Thriller Awards. The short list was announced yesterday during the first International Thriller Writers’ Brunch and Bullets luncheon.

The winners will be announced at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in New York City during Thrillerfest, to be held there in mid-July.

Here are the nominees:

*Best Novel:
**•* **/False Impression /, by Jeffrey Archer (St. Martin’s Press)...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 3/20/2007 4:45:08 AM 

 

On Sunday 18th March 2007, Mark Schreiber’s review of The Risk of Infidelity Index appeared in The Japan Times.

“The Risk of Infidelity Index [is] festooned with memorable characters and a solid plot. Moore probes the country's dark side to new depths. . . . ‘Infidelity’ stays focused on crime and detection, in a tightly written narrative . . . a satisfying read.” Mark Schreiber, The Japan Times

You can read the full review at http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/fb20070318a1.html

A review in a major international newspaper like The Japan Time needs to be put in perspective. With fewer newspapers around the world are running book reviews. Those with review pages are cutting back on the number of reviews. I understand that The Japan Times is also cutting down on the number and length of reviews. ...
Read More>>

Subscribe to this feed • Save to del.icio.us • View CC license • Email this • Email the author • Add to del.icio.us • Digg This! • Share on Facebook • Discuss on Newsvine • Add to Mixx! • Twitter

Posted: 3/18/2007 10:20:10 PM 

 

Go to page 1 : 2 : 3 : 4 : 5 : 6 : 7 : 8 : 9 : 10 : 11 : 12 : 13 : 14 : 15 : 16
17 : 18 : 19 : 20 : 21 : 22 : 23 : 24 : 25 : 26 : 27 : 28 : 29 : 30 : 31 : 32 : 33

HOME : AUTHOR : BOOKS : REVIEWS : BUY BOOKS : EBOOKS : CONTACT
Copyright © 2002-2017 All rights reserved by Christopher G. Moore

Nedstat Basic - Free web site statistics